Gypsy Rose Blanchard’s Lies

Is Gypsy Rose Dangerous?

Amy Punt

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Photo courtesy of Lifetime

Gypsy Rose Blanchard’s story about the night she and her boyfriend, Nicholas Godejohn, murdered her mother, Dee Dee Blanchard, keeps shifting like sand. From her testimony during Godejohn’s trial to the HBO Documentary Mommy Dead and Dearest to the Lifetime docuseries The Prison Confessions of Gypsy Rose Blanchard, Gypsy has shaved the edges off and even changed details from statements surrounding why she murdered her mother, whose idea it was, and what happened in the hours leading up to the murder. She appears to be resuscitating her lost innocence in the eyes of the public. She has said she doesn’t identify with the word “murderer.” The state of Missouri might disagree. She pled guilty to second-degree murder, and a parole board let her walk free in December because she took full responsibility for her crime and said, very convincingly, that she feels remorse.

Listening to her now, as she took the country by storm in national television interviews and podcasts, it’s hard to know what she feels, aside from an all — consuming desire for public adoration. And she’s getting it from the rabid millions of TikTok and Instagram followers who shout down and try to deplatform anyone who disagrees with them. A survivor of Munchausen by Proxy nearly got her TikTok account permanently banned when she pointed out some of the inconsistencies in Gypsy’s interviews.

In Mommy Dead and Dearest, the HBO documentary of Gypsy’s story, a psychiatrist and Munchausen by Proxy expert said that Gypsy’s behavior after the murder indicates a high degree of sociopathy. He also pointed out that, given how she was raised, he’d be surprised if she didn’t manipulate and lie.

I’ve been looking for myself in Gypsy’s life since the murder. I thought we’d look similar; after all, we both survived horrific abuse at the hands of our mothers, including being drugged and poisoned. I studied her meticulously and gave her the benefit of the doubt when I saw her story change. “She’s just doing that to be loved,” I told myself. “She’s not lying about the important stuff.

But she was, and it matters. In Mommy Dead and Dearest, Gypsy says her mother’s last words were, “Please don’t hurt me.” They had been fighting but had made up, painted each other’s nails hot pink, and watched…

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Amy Punt

Writing about Personal Growth, Trauma, Recovery and the cultural moments that reflect our hidden traumas.